lazy

lazy, indolent, slothful, faineant are comparable primarily as applied to persons, their powers, movements, and actions, but also in some degree to things. All mean not easily aroused to action or activity. Lazy especially when applied to persons suggests a disinclination or aversion to effort or work and usually connotes idleness or dawdling, even when one is supposedly at work; the term is commonly derogatory
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rubbing their sleepy eyes with lazy wrists— Keats

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Una, now twenty-three, grandly beautiful, alternately lazy and amazingly energetic— Rose Macaulay

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we were too lazy .... We passed our indolent days leaving everything to somebody else— H. G. Wells

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Indolent implies an habitual love of ease and a settled dislike of movement or activity
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the stretching, indolent ease that the flesh and the spirit of this creature invariably seemed to move with— Wister

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he was so good- natured, and so indolent, that I lost more than I got by him; for he made me as idle as himself— Cowper

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Slothful suggests the temper or indolence of one who is inactive when he knows he should be active or who moves or acts with excessive slowness when speed is essential
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be not slothful, but followers of them who through faith and patience inherit the promises— Heb 6:12

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not despondency, not slothful anguish, is what you now require, —but effort— Hawthorne

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he would . . . jog a slothful conscience and marshal its forces— Parrington

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Faineant implies both a slothful temper and a disposition to remain idly indifferent in spite of pressure or urgency
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he does not abandon hope in the masses ... or see the people animated only by a faineant desire to be ruled— New Republic

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carpet-knight ... is used as a term of reproach for a soldier who stays at home, and avoids active service and its hardships, with a particular reference to the carpet of a lady's chamber, in which such a faineant soldier lingers— Encyc. Brit.

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Analogous words: inert, idle, inactive, supine, passive: torpid, comatose, sluggish, iethargic: ianguid, languorous, lackadaisical, listless: slack, remiss, lax, *negligent, neglectful

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Łazy — Łazy …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Lazy — can refer to: * Laziness, the lack of desire to expend effort * Łazy, a town in Poland (and other places in Poland with the same name) * Lazy (Orlová), a former village now part of the town of Orlová in the Czech Republic * Lazy (song), by Suede… …   Wikipedia

  • Lazy Y U — Lugar designado por el censo de los Estados Unidos …   Wikipedia Español

  • Lazy ML — (LML) is a functional programming language developed in the early 1980s by Lennart Augustsson and Thomas Johnsson at Chalmers University of Technology, prior to Miranda and Haskell. LML is a strongly typed, statically scoped language with lazy… …   Wikipedia

  • Lazy — bezeichnet Lazy, Ortsteil von Orlová, Okres Karvina, Tschechien Lazy, Ortsteil von Lázně Kynžvart, Okres Cheb, Tschechien Lazy, Stadtviertel von Zlín, Okres Zlín, Tschechien siehe auch Łazy (Begriffsklärung) Lázy …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Lazy — La zy, a. [Compar. {Lazier}; superl. {Laziest}.] [OE. lasie, laesic, of uncertain origin; cf. F. las tired, L. lassus, akin to E. late; or cf. LG. losig, lesig.] 1. Disinclined to action or exertion; averse to labor; idle; shirking work. Bacon.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Lázy — ist der Name mehrerer Orte in Tschechien Lázy , Ortsteil von Městečko Trnávka, Okres Svitavy Lázy, Ortsteil von Loučka, Okres Vsetín; siehe Lázy (Loučka) Diese Seite ist eine Begriffsklärung zur Unterscheidung mehrerer mit demselben Wort… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Lazy-i — is an online music magazine of Tim McMahan that includes feature interviews, reviews and news. The focus is on the indie music scene on national bands as well as local music in the Omaha, Nebraska area. The articles are also featured in a weekly… …   Wikipedia

  • lazy — (adj.) 1540s, laysy, of unknown origin. Replaced native slack, slothful, and idle as the main word expressing the notion of averse to work. In 19c. thought to be from LAY (Cf. lay) (v.) as tipsy from tip. Skeat is responsible for the prevailing… …   Etymology dictionary

  • lazy — [lā′zē] adj. lazier, laziest [Early ModE, prob. < MLowG or MDu, as in MLowG lasich, slack, loose < IE les , slack, tired, akin to base * lēi : see LATE] 1. not eager or willing to work or exert oneself; indolent; slothful 2. slow and heavy; …   English World dictionary

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